Category Archives: Wire Manufacturer

Wire Harness 101 with a Wire & Cable Manufacturer

Wire Harness 101 with a Wire & Cable Manufacturer

Wire harnesses can be tricky without the help of an experienced wire and cable manufacturer.

At its most basic, a wire harness is an effective way to organize wires or cables by grouping or bundling them together in order to transmit signal or electrical power. They can be used in almost any application that requires multiple wires or cables. While many of these harnesses are complex with multiple wires and components, they don’t have to be. A wire and cable manufacturer is able to design and produce a wide variety of complex or simple wire harnesses that are truly tailored to the needs of your project.

Benefits of Wire Harnesses

Complex equipment and machinery often require a great deal of wiring to function. Running each and every one of these wires separately can be time consuming. Additionally, that many wires can be bulky if there are space constraints, and keeping multiple wires organized and running in the right direction can be challenging. Integrating the component cables and wires into a single harness allows for faster, easier installation that doesn’t take up more valuable space than necessary.

However, there’s more to it than just a neat and tidy wiring system. In some cases, it is extremely important to prevent certain wires from coming into contact. Designing a wire harness instead of running individual wires allows a wire and cable manufacturer to better protect the conductors from environmental issues like vibration, moisture, heat, cold, and abrasion. Bundled wires can also be further protected from shorts and electrical fires by using non-flexing or flame retardant jacketing materials.

Manual Assembly

Believe it or not, a wire harness is more efficiently manufactured by hand. There are steps during the pre-production stage that can be automated, but the assembly process can be complex. Depending on the needs of the project, production can include multiple steps, such as:wire harness

  • Taping Breakouts
  • Binding Components with Tape, Cable Ties, or Clamps
  • Conducting Multiple Crimps
  • Routing Wires through Sleeves

This makes manual assembly more economical, especially when working in small batches. The manual assembly process also means wire harnesses can take a little longer to produce than individual wires. It’s vital to work with an experienced wire and cable manufacturer that understands how to keep the production process on schedule.

Testing Performed by a Wire & Cable Manufacturer

No reputable wire and cable manufacturer would deliver a wire harness that has not been fully tested. However, the sheer number of cable and wire components makes this process a little more involved than testing individual wires. That’s where a pre-programmed test board comes in. By programming the test board with the required electrical characteristics for the project, we are able to plug in the finished wire harness and test the components individually or in groups as needed making for a safer, more stable final product.

Conclusion

An experienced wire and cable manufacturer is a valuable partner when you need a well-designed wire harness. Not only are they able to design a harness that meets all of the requirements of your equipment, but they are also knowledgeable enough to understand the time and budgetary challenges involved in producing a complex solution. When you’re ready to start your next project, contact the team at Meridian Cable. We look forward to talking with you.

5 Points to Discuss with a Custom Cable Manufacturer

5 Points to Discuss with a Custom Cable Manufacturer

Being clear about what you need at the start of your project is key to a successful relationship with your custom cable manufacturer.

Regular readers know we stress good communication with your custom cable manufacturer throughout the design and manufacturing process. More information, especially during the design phase, can help the team address potential issues before they become costly problems further down the road. However, we know it can be difficult to understand what kind of information is the most helpful. So we put together a list of some areas to discuss that will help your next custom cable project go more smoothly and result in a more successful product.

1. Previous Designs

If you are starting from scratch with a design for a brand new cable, you can probably skip this conversation. But if you’re replacing an existing cable assembly, this is the perfect opportunity to improve on the previous design. Talk to your custom cable manufacturer about the quality, cost, and performance of your existing cable. Let them know what is and is not working, and what could work better. Using your existing cable as a starting place allows you to really focus on what you need in a cable moving forward.

2. Basic Technical Requirements

This seems obvious, but coming up with a list of requirements for your custom cable manufacturer is a good way to make sure all of the absolute must-haves are met. Requirements might include voltage, number of contacts, signal speed, grounding, etc. Taking some time to understand what you need before the design phase will help save time and money when creating a custom cable assembly.

3. Environmental Concernscustom wire

Not taking the environmental conditions a cable must withstand into consideration during the design phase can be the reason the final product is unsatisfactory or fails prematurely. Concerns like moisture, heat, and cold are obvious, but they are not the only types of things you should be thinking about. For example, cables used in medical facilities often have additional requirements to ensure they are able to be sterilized for use with multiple patients. But, this is only one of many situations that you should talk through with your custom cable manufacturer.

4. Connector Types

A custom cable manufacturer can use a wide variety of connectors in your cable design, but the two main types are assembled and overmolded. In general, assembled connectors are less expensive to produce and molded connectors tend to be more durable. However, each type has it’s pros and cons, which should be discussed with your cable manufacturer’s engineering team to make sure you make the right choice for your application.

5. Safety Requirements

Most custom cables must comply with safety regulations. A reputable custom cable manufacturer should be able to discuss how their processes ensure the resulting product meets the appropriate standards. However, it’s also important to discuss any special requirements before the design stage to make sure all standards will be met.

Conclusion

Help your custom cable manufacturer design a better cable with some careful thought about what you need. Communicating as many details as you can as early as possible makes the design process run more smoothly and helps make sure your custom cable is tailored to the needs of your equipment. Good communication in the early stages of a project can also help save both time and money both in the short and long terms.

If you’re ready to share the specifications for your next project, contact the team at Meridian Cable. We’re happy to answer any questions!

Important Certifications for a Cable Assembly Manufacturer

Important Certifications for a Cable Assembly Manufacturer

Paying attention to a custom cable assembly manufacturer’s certifications is essential in today’s marketplace.

If you’ve recently been on the website of a cable assembly manufacturer, you have almost certainly noticed certifications listed in a prominent location. With so many options when it comes to certifications, it can be difficult to know what is important and, above all, reputable when reviewing manufacturers.

Obviously, different types of manufacturers should have certifications that are most applicable to their industries and products. There are many of these certifications that are nice to have, but not absolutely necessary, and you should evaluate these with your project and equipment needs in mind. However, if you are working with a cable assembly manufacturer, there are certifications from two organizations that are worth paying closer attention to.

ISO – International Organization for Standardization

The International Organization for Standardization is recognized around the world as an independent source of best practices for a wide range of industries. Seeing an ISO accreditation on a cable assembly manufacturer’s website signals that they are a credible organization that is committed to creating safe products of high quality.  ISO certification for cable assembly manufacturer

In an industry where product failure can be life-threatening, it’s vital you work with a manufacturer that takes your concerns about safety seriously. If you don’t see any mention of an ISO certification, it’s worth having a discussion about why not. There are also many types of ISO certifications, so it can be valuable to familiarize yourself with any specific accreditations you see.

UL – Underwriters Laboratories

You may be more familiar with UL from the stamp that appears on products like light bulbs and lamps that are meant to function using electricity. UL ratings like these can help consumers determine in what types of conditions the product is meant to perform. This can also be the case for custom cable assemblies. Like ISO, UL can be focused on ensuring the quality and safety of the end product. However, UL also offers certification of the manufacturing process to make sure a company is able to to produce safe products that meet standards.

Additional Certifications for a Cable Assembly Manufacturer

ISO and UL are well-known and offer certifications for a wide range of industries, processes, and products, but they aren’t the only options. If you see certifications you are unfamiliar with, don’t hesitate to ask about them. The team at your cable assembly manufacturer should be ready to discuss their reasonings behind pursuing specific accreditations. There are also industry-specific options (like AS9100 for aerospace) that may be appropriate for your project. Always make sure you follow up any questions you ask the manufacturer by doing your own research.

 

Certifications can be extremely valuable when you are evaluating a cable assembly manufacturer. They not only show a dedication to producing safe products and working environments, but also demonstrate a dedication to staying at the top of industry best practices by maintaining standards that are continually updated. With a little knowledge, you can use this information to make the best choice. When you are ready to talk about your next project, the Meridian Cable is happy to answer all your questions. Get in touch with us, today!

Hiring a Cable Assembly Manufacturer: What to Think about First

Hiring a Cable Assembly Manufacturer: What to Think about First

So, you need a custom cable, but don’t know what to look for in a cable assembly manufacturer.

One cable assembly manufacturer is not necessarily the same as another. Each has specific capabilities and experience that make them the right choice for designing and manufacturing different types of cable. But how do you even begin the search if you don’t know what questions to ask or information to provide?

Over the years, Meridian’s engineers have come up with a method to quickly determine what kind of cable assembly a customer needs that could be helpful when you are given the task of finding a wire and cable manufacturer.

Determining the General Type of Cable

The Meridian team starts with the simple assumption that all cable assemblies carry power or signal from one end to the other. The first step we take is to find out which the assembly needs to carry, or both. Since we extrude our own cable, we can handle any of these scenarios, but there are some power or signal cables we can’t make. Determining that from the beginning is critical for us and should be for you as well.

Power

Power, for the most part, is easy to determine. The more power a cable needs to deliver, the more conductive material it requires. For example, it’s easy to pass 1 amp of current through a 24 awg conductor that is 1 foot long. However, bad things can happen very quickly if you try passing 20 amps through a 24 awg conductor. We don’t make high power cables at Meridian. If the power transmission requirements are above about 40 amps, we are upfront with the customer about our capabilities. Since we’ve been around long enough to know which companies do extrude high power cables, we will happily share that information.

It should be noted that, with power, often all you need to know is the voltage and current. In many cases, customers don’t have this information, but they do know what is on either end of the needed assembly. Most times, we can make a rough determination of the voltage and current by knowing what devices the assembly is connecting. From there, the design can be narrowed significantly enough to get the process moving.

Signal

Signals, for the most part, are complicated. Sure it’s all data, but new ways of transferring data are created all the time. For example, think of your TV 10, 20, or 30 years ago. (Some of us here at Meridian are old enough to remember TVs 30 years ago.) The number and types of connectors on the backs of TVs have changed radically over the years, but all those connectors pass signals. 30 years ago, it was not uncommon for two wires to come from an antenna on top of the TV or up on the roof. All the antennae cable passed was the image that appeared on the screen — without any data about time, channel, audio, etc. Now, the typical input is an HDMI cable that carries a ton of data — some slow, some fast, but all signals.

It’s vitally important to communicate what types of signals your cables need to carry at the beginning of your search for a cable assembly manufacturer. For example, Meridian is capable of manufacturing a wide variety of cables that carry signals. However, we are not able to make coax cables that carry signals in the high gigahertz range. Having candid initial conversations with clear requirements can save you a lot of time. The good news is you don’t need to know the exact technical parameters or specifications that will be transmitted for cable. Often, knowing the gadgets to be connected to the cable assembly and any standards the signals must conform to helps the Meridian team determine whether we can make the cable or not. If we can’t, we’ll be happy to let you know companies that can.

Questions to Consider before Talking to a Cable Assembly Manufacturer

If you are tasked with finding a cable assembly vendor, here is a simple checklist of questions to think through before you start reaching out:electric cable assembly manufacturer

  1. Can samples be made with off-the-shelf cable? If yes, then you can go to a lot of different vendors. If not then you need a vendor who can extrude cable, like Meridian.
  2. Does the cable need to carry signal, power or both? If only signal or power that makes it a lot easier to find a vendor. If it needs to carry both then a custom cable extruder like Meridian might be needed.
  3. If power is needed; how much? This can be expressed in technical terms (voltage/current) or by knowing what items need the power. For example, a cell phone, data input tablet, fork truck or nuclear power plant.
  4. If signal is needed; what kind? Many signals have technical names/specification numbers. If those are known the problem is solved and if not knowing the devices passing/receiving the signal will go a long way in determining what is needed.
  5. Lastly, how many assemblies are needed? This can be as low as one up to millions. It can be several for prototype, then more for Beta/First Articles/PPAP, and then on to production quantities. All vendors have a volume sweet spot. Knowing the quantity can often help save valuable time ruling vendors both in and out.

Hopefully this very simple guideline helped. (Apologies to any engineers who read this and found some of it is not technically pure. We’re happy to talk more technically…maybe a little too happy.) Obviously, there are many items to consider when designing and producing a custom cable assembly. This basic approach will help make the process of finding the right cable assembly manufacturer a little easier.

At Meridian, we have experienced designing and extruding a wide range of custom cables. If you’re ready to talk about what we can do for you, please get in touch.

Determining the Shape of a Custom Coil Cord

Determining the Shape of a Custom Coil Cord

The shape of a custom coil cord is one of the most important elements when designing this type of cable.

Custom coil cord is known for its flexibility, making it the perfect choice for applications that require a cable that can stretch and retract without putting additional stress on the wire. It has the ability to extend beyond the natural length at rest, which can be a real space-saving feature. These cords are flexible beyond simple extending and retracting in that they can also be pulled, bent, and twisted without experiencing the metal fatigue of a straight cable.

Coiled cable can be used to carry electrical currents as well as data and signal for telecommunications applications. This versatility makes coil cords ideal for use in environments that are often too rough for non-coiled cable. Coil cords are used in everything from equipment on industrial and construction sites to portable electronics, like sound equipment. With so many applications at so many different sizes, the shape of your custom coil cord is key to its successful performance.

Requirements Determine the Shape of Coiled Cable

If you’ve ever seen a telephone cord, you’ll recognize the shape of a coiled cable – curled in the middle with a section of straight cable at each end. While the specifications of the straight sections are important to the overall function of the cable, it is the coiled section that provides the cord with its unique benefits. The retracted length of the cord is how long it is at rest. This is the most common way to specify how long the cord should be. However, it is also necessary to communicate the full length the cord must extend to, so the engineers at your custom cable manufacturer are able to get a full understanding of the requirements of your cable.

The coil’s diameter is a key measurement when determining how far a custom coil cable should extend. In general, a coil with a larger outer diameter with stretch farther than a coil with a smaller outer diameter. When discussing your cable’s specifications with your cable manufacturer, retracted length, extended length, and outer coil diameter will provide a good starting place for the designer regarding the cable’s physical shape.

Fine-Tuning a Cable’s Performance

While you may be able to get pretty close to the final shape of your custom coil cable on your own, the cable’s construction and materials are best selected with the help of an experienced wire and cable manufacturer. Selecting specific fillers and jacketing materials can also add durability to the finished cord. Depending on how tough you need your cable to be, materials can include:custom coil cord

  • PU
  • PTEE
  • TPR
  • SVO
  • SJOW
  • Kevlar®
  • Spectra®
  • Teflon®

An expert cable manufacturer like Meridian Cable, learns everything they can about how your coil cable needs to function. This allows them to make the best recommendations on the materials and physical shape to ensure the finished cable meets the needs of your product or equipment. Rest assured that no matter what your application, a custom coil cord solution can be designed and produced to perfectly match your specifications.

Design Services from Custom Wire and Cable Manufacturers

Design Services from Custom Wire and Cable Manufacturers

New products or pieces of machinery often have unique, specific requirements that can’t be met by stock cable

When developing a new product, the last thing you should be worrying about is whether there’s an existing cable that meets all the requirements for performance, durability, and price. The reality is that there may not be an existing solution that will meet all your requirements at a reasonable price point. And while your engineers may know what your cable needs to do, they most likely lack the experience with different conductors, jacketing materials, fillers, and insulations required to design a cable from scratch. Custom wire and cable manufacturers can provide a level of expertise in the area of electrical engineering that can save time and cost while developing the right cable for your application.

Designing a custom cable can be a challenging process, but a reputable cable and wire manufacturer acts as a partner every step of the way. They will walk you through the process to ensure that they are using the appropriate materials for your precise requirements. In many cases, they can even produce a prototype that allows you to test the cable on your product.

Thorough Consultations Make for Great Designs

The best way to ensure your custom cable meets all of your product’s requirements is to share as much information with your wire and cable manufacturer as possible. The first step in this process is to meet with their engineering team to share all of the specifications, as well as any applicable drawings. Don’t forget to make sure your drawings are created in a common format that can be easily accessed by the manufacturer. This will save both time and frustration for both parties.

As the next step, the manufacturer’s electrical engineering team will review your product’s specifications to ensure they have the capabilities to produce the type of cable you need on your requested timeline. It may be that they do not have the equipment or facilities to produce your cable. At this point, their team should be able to give you an idea of why they are not able to meet your specifications, whether the job requirements are realistic, and possibly make recommendations on how to feasibly produce the cable.

Collaborating with Wire and Cable Manufacturers on a Successful Cable Solution

Wire and cable manufacturers are the experts on customized cabling solutions, but you are the expert on your product. They will continue to hold conversations with you throughout the design process regarding voltage ratings, electrical tolerance, environmental parameters, and flexibility to ensure they choose a conductor material that performs as expected.

Further conversations about the cable’s function and expected environmental conditions will inform recommendations about insulating and jacketing materials. They may ask questions like:

  • Does the cable need to withstand high temperatures?
  • Does it require extra protection, like metal armoring?
  • Are there concerns about signal interference?
  • Does it need to meet spec standards like, UL, CSA, CE, or Mil-Spec?

Keeping Communication Open

Open communication is the key to ensuring positive relationships with wire and cable manufacturers. Designing a custom cable can be a complicated process, but if you provide their team with as much information as possible, it doesn’t have to be frustrating. And don’t forget to speak up if you need help. Experienced engineers, like the team at Meridian Cable, are always happy to answer your questions.

Single and Multi-Stranded Wiring for Cable Assemblies

Ensuring that your manufacturer’s cable assembly meets your product’s specific design requirements.

Determining the various differences and use cases for single strand and Multi-Stranded Wiring and conductors can be difficult. The difference isn’t a visible one, and with all of the variables in designing custom wiring, it’s not likely to be one that you and your team think of. However, this difference can dictate whether your product succeeds or fails – if a wire in your product cannot withstand movement and cracks as a result, it’s not likely to be well received by customers. To ensure that your product uses a conductor material that is suited for your industry and the type of custom cable that you will be utilizing, work with your manufacturer’s engineers and designers to ensure that the best choices are being made for your custom cable.

Here are some of the important differences between single and multi-stranded wiring, and what these differences will mean to your final product:

Single Stranded Wiring:

  • This type of wiring is typically less expensive to manufacture than a multi-stranded wire as it does not require as much processing.
  • Single stranded wire is not as flexible as the alternative. This lack of flexibility can increase the likelihood of metal fatigue and the wire snapping as a result. Because of this, single stranded wires are best suited for products that won’t encounter much movement.
  • This type of wiring is often only used in smaller gauge wiring applications as it can be difficult to maneuver and utilize a heavy gauge, single conductor wire.

Multi-Stranded Wiring:

  • This type of wiring has a higher cost due to the need for more rounds of extrusion and stranding.
  • Multi-strand wiring is more flexible and less susceptible to cracking and metal fatigue than single stranded conductors. This makes it the preferable solution for wiring that will need to maneuver and bend without experiencing metal fatigue.
  • The increased surface area of multi-stranded conductors decreases the amount of resistance that currents or signal passing through the wire will encounter.
  • Multi-stranded wiring can create challenges when soldering connectors or terminals as it can be difficult to ensure that all of the small strands have been soldered properly.  If this type of wire is soldered, it is good practice to tin the wire first. This type of wiring is better suited for use with an application that requires a crimp connector. The small, flexible strands of wire typically crimp easily and mold to the crimp connector very well.
Multi-Stranded Wiring
Multi-Stranded Wiring

Types of stranding arrangements for Multi-Stranded Wiring

If your project seems suited for multi-conductor wiring, there are a variety of geometric arrangements that the wires can be put into to optimize the final product. These geometries include:

  • Concentric Arrangements – This is a common wire arrangement in which the conductors  are arranged in concentric circles. The benefit of this arrangement is that the wires can be bunched tightly together to maintain the wire’s shape, reducing the need for additional filler material in many instances.
  • Bunch Arrangements – Unlike concentric stranding, the wires are not arranged in a specific geometry, but are simply grouped together and then twisted to ensure that they remain tightly packed.
  • Rope Arrangements – This arrangement groups strands of conductors together in several small bundles. These bundles are then arranged in concentric circles. This increases the flexibility of the final wire, making it ideal for applications that require a great deal of movement or will be housed in a product that moves frequently or in multiple directions. This arrangement is more popular in applications with a larger wire gauge size, adding to the product’s overall durability and functionality.
  • Annular Arrangements – In this arrangement, conductors are centered around a circular core that is not typically conductive. This helps the conductor material to retain its shape. This arrangement can be helpful for reducing the wire’s resistance.

These are just a few of the various geometric shapes that can be used in the wire and cable manufacturing process. Choosing the most effective type of conductor for your wiring project is key to its efficiency and reducing the odds that your product will need service down the line.

Will Single or Multi-Stranded Wiring Be Suited To Your Custom Cable Assembly?

Gauges for Custom Wiring

Optimize your product by choosing the right conductor and Gauges for Custom Wiring and your custom cable assembly.

Make your product as effective as possible with these tips for designing custom wiring and identifying proper gauges for custom wiring.

The size of a wire’s conductor plays an important role in the functionality of the final product. The gauge of the conductor material impacts the flow of signal and electricity through a wiring system and can alter the cost of the wiring as a result of the amount of material needed to extrude a conductor of the specified size.

wire and cable manufacturers
wire and cable manufacturers

Determining the appropriate Gauges for Custom Wiring is fairly complex, and custom cable assembly manufacturers must gain an understanding of the final product’s uses and nuances such as the length of wire that will be needed to connect the terminals, the voltage or signal type that the wire must carry, and a variety of additional aspects.

After all of these details have been taken into account, the manufacturer will have to work through a series of steps and equations to properly determine which gauge will be most appropriate for your project. While it’s a complex process, there are a few factors that can be taken into account to help estimate the most appropriate wire gauge for your custom assemblies:

The Wire’s Resistance

The wire’s resistance is dependent, in part, on the gauge of the conductor. The larger the circumference of the wire, the less resistance the signal or electrical current passing through it will encounter. If the gauge is too small; the wire’s circumference is not large enough to handle the current passing through it and the wire risks becoming overheated. This is because of the high resistance created by the current as it attempts to pass through a wire that is too small to accommodate that many electrons. This could also prevent your product from working as effectively as possible because it is receiving the wrong amount of signal.

Resistance is Also Tied to the Wire’s Length

The longer the wire, the farther the signal will have to travel before reaching a terminal point. This creates increased resistance which can weaken the signal as it passes through the cable’s wire. Your manufacturer may have to use a wire with a larger gauge to ensure that the signal is able to travel across longer runs effectively without losing too much thermal energy.

A Note About the Way Gauges are Labeled

Gauges are a bit counterintuitive in that as the physical size of the wire decreases; the gauge is referred to by a larger number. So a 12 gauge wire is physically larger in circumference than an 18 gauge wire, despite the assumption that the 18 gauge wire would be larger. As one would expect, the larger the wire, the more signal it can carry with less resistance.

Why Not Always Use a Larger Gauge?

A larger gauge size does have several benefits, such as potentially reducing energy costs, but it can also increase the cost of your product and prove to be unnecessary past a certain extent. The additional cost results from the increased copper or conductor material that will be necessary to make the conductor. However, extremely small conductors will also increase the cost of your cabling assembly as a result of the extensive extrusion process that they must go through.

Custom cable assemblies are intricate and it’s important to work with a manufacturer who understands this and has experience producing custom projects. Ask your manufacturer about their production and sourcing process, as well as similar products that they have made or provided service for. This will help you to determine their level of experience in your specific industry.

Working With Custom Cable Assembly Manufacturers to Determine the Proper Gauges for Your Custom Wiring

Wire Harnesses and Wire Assemblies

The very first step in assembling a wire harness is to cut the wires to the desired length, usually done by a special wire-cutting machine. After this, the ends of the wires are then stripped to expose the core of the wires. The next step is to fit the wires with any required terminals or connector housings, which come in many different sizes and specifications. Lastly, the wires are assembled into a harness, involving either a workbench or assembly board which must be set up according to design specifications.

cable assemblies

Wire assemblies can be made by hand or machine – each method requiring many different process. These include routing and inserting wires through sleeves, taping the wires, crimping terminals onto wires, fastening strands with tape, clamps, or cable ties, etc. Because there are so many intricate steps involved in designing and manufacturing wire harnesses, many of the processes are still done by hand or semi-automatic machinery. If you’re not sure how wire harnesses and wire assemblies are designed and manufactured, the good news is – we will do it for you.

Simple or Complex

Some wire harnesses are very simple – just two wires with basic terminals on the end. Other wire harnesses are much more complex and involve multiple wires, connectors and terminals. Depending on what type of harness you require, there are many factors to consider: conductor sizes, stranding sizes, conductor color, etc. We offer a wide variety of simple or complex wire harnesses and wire assemblies designed and manufactured for your specific needs. Meridian Cable has all the equipment needed to process wire harnesses to any degree of accuracy, from basic hand tools to semi-automatic machines to fully automated systems.

Wire harnesses are small and light, which makes them easy-to-use and operate. However, wire harnesses often need custom-designed shapes in addition to all the other elements: sheathing, mechanical fastening and over-molded connectors, grommets or strain reliefs. We have the capacity to custom design even the most complex of wire harnesses.

Wiring Approval

At Meridian Cable, all of our manufacturing facilities are UL certified. Safety is, after all, our number one priority. When it comes to designing and manufacturing wire harnesses and wire assemblies, we don’t cut any corners or sacrifice any quality; we design and manufacture only the highest of quality wire harnesses and wire assemblies to the highest of safety standards.

Improperly insulated or connected wire harnesses are hazardous, and can lead to injury or even fatality. Indeed, wire harnesses are designed according to very specific geometric and electrical requirements which, if improperly followed, can lead to malfunctioning harnesses.

How Are Wire Harnesses and Wire Assemblies Designed and Manufactured?